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A Guide To Living With A Stoma More For You


LIVING WITH A STOMA




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DISCLAIMER


100% accuracy at time of writing cannot be guaranteed.  A listing in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and does not mean it is an endorsement.  All companies listed are tried at the reader’s own risk.  All information provided is intended as a supplement to any professional help already

given.  Before acting on suggestions from anyone, ostomates are advised to check with a doctor or stoma care nurse that the course of action is suitable

for them. Whilst every care is taken, the author will not be held responsible.

ABDOMEN


The abdomen is the body space between the thorax (chest) and the pelvis (above the hips).  The diaphragm forms the upper surface of the abdomen.  The abdomen ends at the pelvic bones, where

the pelvis begins.


The abdomen contains all the digestive organs, including the stomach, small and large intestines, pancreas, liver, kidneys, spleen and gallbladder.


ABDOMINOPERINEAL RESECTION


An abdominoperineal resection is a resection of a part of the lower bowel in which all or part of

the colon and rectum, and anus are removed.  Two incisions are needed – one through the

abdomen, and one through the perineum (the area between the genitals and the anus).   


ABSORPTION


Absorption is the method by which nutrients from food move from the small intestine into the cells in

the body.


ACCESSORIES


Accessory products assist in stoma management and may be used to enhance the performance of a pouching system. They include items such as belts, creams, deodorants, odour eliminators, paste,

pouch clips/closures, pouch covers, powders, seals, sprays, etc.


They do not include the stoma pouch (bag) or flanges (baseplate/wafer).





ACCESSORY DIGESTIVE ORGANS


Accessory digestive organs are organs, which help with digestion, but are not part of the digestive tract.  These organs are the tongue, gallbladder, glands in the mouth that make saliva, liver and pancreas.


ADHESIONS


Adhesions are an internal growth of scar tissue following surgery or sepsis.  Bands of this fibrous scar tissue bind together two surfaces, which normally should be separate, i.e. there is an act of adhering

or sticking.  For example, loops of bowel.  Adhesions can often cause complications, such as pain, constipation and sometimes bowel (intestinal) blockages in a post-surgical patient.


ADHESIVE REMOVER


Adhesive removers help clean adhesive, which remains on the skin after the flange has been removed.




ALLERGY


An allergy is a hypersensitivity or adverse response to a substance. This causes the body to react to

any contact with it.  In ostomy care, a person may be allergic to some part of the pouching system,

such as the flange, etc.  However, allergies are fairly uncommon, and there may be other reasons for

a reaction to a material.


ALIMENTARY CANAL


See Gastrointestinal Tract.


ANAL FISTULA


An anal fistula is an abnormal channel, which develops between the anus and the skin.  Most fistulas

are the result of an abscess (infection), which spreads to the skin.


ANALGESIC  

  
Analgesic is the medical name for painkillers. An analgesic is any group of medicines used to relieve pain.


ANASTOMOSIS


An anastomosis is an operation to connect two body parts.  An example is an operation in which part

of the colon is removed, and the two remaining ends are rejoined.


ANGIOGRAM


An angiogram is an x-ray, which uses dye to detect bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract.


ANTI-REFLUX VALVE


An anti-reflux valve is a valve, which may be incorporated into urostomy appliances.  This valve stops

the urine from going back into the kidneys, once it has drained into the pouch.


ANUS


The anus is the external opening of the rectum, where solid waste exits the body.


APPLIANCE


An appliance is a collection device for waste eliminated from the body.  It consists of a pouch and

flange (one or two piece), which is worn by the ostomate.


See Pouch and Stoma Appliance.


A-P RESECTION


See Abdominoperineal Resection.


ASCENDING COLON


The ascending colon is the part of the colon on the right side of the abdomen.  It is the portion of

the colon connecting to the caecum and appendix, or first part of the large intestine.


ASCENDING COLOSTOMY


See Colostomy.


ASYMPTOMATIC


Asymptomatic is the condition of having a disease, but without any symptoms of it.


ATONIC COLON


Atonic colon is the lack of normal muscle tone or movement (peristalsis) in the colon.  This is caused

by the overuse of laxatives or by Hirschsprung’s Disease.  It may result in chronic constipation.  

Atonic colon is also called lazy colon.








BAG


See Pouch.


BALLOONING


Ballooning occurs when a stoma pouch, which is being worn by a patient, fills up with flatus.  This

is most likely to be seen when a filter is blocked or ineffective, or where there is no filter on the pouch.


BARIUM


Barium is a white, chalky liquid, which is used to coat the inside of organs in order that they will

show up on an x-ray.


BARIUM ENEMA X-RAY


A barium enema is an x-ray examination of the large intestine (large bowel) and rectum.  The

intestine does not show up sufficiently on a regular x-ray without barium being used.  Barium is a

white, chalky liquid, which makes the large intestine visible on an x-ray, and is given through the

rectum.  It looks white on r-ray pictures and fills the part of the bowel, which medical

professionals need to see.  It is also called lower GI series.


BARNETT CONTINENT INTESTINAL RESERVOIR


See Continent Ileostomy.


BASEPLATE


See Flange.


BCIR POUCH


See Continent Ileostomy.


BELT


See Ostomy Belt.


BIOPSY


A biopsy is the removing of a small piece of body tissue for examination, especially under a

microscope, in order to diagnose the nature and extent of a disease.


BILE DUCTS


Bile ducts are tubes, which carry bile from the liver to the gallbladder for storage, and to the small intestine for use in digestion.


BLADDER


The bladder is an organ, which acts as a container for urine.


BOWEL


See Small Intestine and Large Intestine.


BOWEL BLOCKAGE


See Bowel Obstruction.


BOWEL INCONTINENCE

    
Bowel incontinence is described as the loss of bowel control.


BOWEL OBSTRUCTION


A bowel obstruction is a blockage or occlusion in the digestive or urinary tract, where the flow of

digestion products (liquids or solids) is stopped from continuing through the intestines.  The

peristaltic motion of the intestine continues, and causes great pain.  Other symptoms are little

or no output from the stoma for several hours, nausea and sometimes fever.  If the obstruction

does not move within a few hours, it is extremely important to seek medical advice.


BOWEL PREP


Bowel prep is normally needed before bowel surgery and certain diagnostic procedures.  It consists of taking a laxative, so that the system is thoroughly emptied.


BRICKER’S LOOP


See Ileal Conduit.


BROOKE ILEOSTOMY


See Conventional Ileostomy.


BULKING AGENTS


Bulking agents are laxatives, which make bowel movements soft and easy to pass.




















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