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A Guide To Living With A Stoma More For You


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DISCLAIMER


100% accuracy at time of writing cannot be guaranteed.  A listing in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and does not mean it is an endorsement.  All companies listed are tried at the reader’s own risk.  All information provided is intended as a supplement to any professional help already

given.  Before acting on suggestions from anyone, ostomates are advised to check with a doctor or stoma care nurse that the course of action is suitable

for them. Whilst every care is taken, the author will not be held responsible.

TEMPORARY COLOSTOMY


A temporary colostomy is a procedure, which temporarily bypasses the lower part of the colon in order to allow it to rest or heal.  It may have one or two openings (if two, one will discharge mucous only).  It can later be reversed to restore the normal path of food waste through the body.


See Stoma Reversal.


TEMPORARY ILEOSTOMY


A temporary ileostomy is a loop of the small intestine, which is brought through the skin, and the

colon and rectum are not removed.  Temporary ileostomies are often made as the first stage in a surgical construction of an ileoanal pouch, so that faeces does not enter the newly-made pouch until testing for leaks and healing has taken place.  The temporary ileostomy may be reversed by repairing the loop of the small intestine and closing the skin incision.


See Stoma Reversal.


TEMPORARY OSTOMY


A temporary ostomy is a digestive tract ostomy, in which the rectum and anus have not been removed, or a urinary tract ostomy in which the bladder has not been removed.


See Stoma Reversal.


TOTAL PARENTERAL NUTRITION


See Parenteral Nutrition.


TPN


See Parental Nutrition.


TRANSITIONAL CELLS


Transitional cells are one of the cell types, which line the bladder wall.  Most bladder cancers begin in the transitional cells.


TRANSPARENT POUCH


The pouch film on this product is transparent, as it is designed to allow a patient to see the pouch contents.  In some situations, some ostomates prefer this type of pouch, as opposed to an opaque one.


TRANSVERSE COLON


The transverse colon is the part of the colon, which goes across the abdomen from right to left.  It is

the middle section of the large intestine, which connects the ascending colon and the descending colon.


TRANSVERSE COLOSTOMY


See Colostomy.


TWO-PIECE STOMA POUCH


A two-piece stoma pouch system comes in two pieces - the flange is separate from the pouch.  The flange attaches directly to the skin, and can remain in place for two to four days, which is kinder to the skin.  The second part, the pouch, attaches to the flange, and is locked together to create the pouching system.  The most common closure is a pressure-fit snap ring, very similar to the seal, which is used in Tupperware food containers.   More recently, there has been development of stick-on coupling systems, which rely on adhesive.


The pouches with the pressure-fit snap ring influence the flexibility of the pouch, because the rings are plastic, and therefore these flanges are not as flexible as a one-piece pouch system.  Some ostomates find that the stick-on coupling system is easier to use, and allows for more flexibility.


This system allows the pouch to be changed, whilst the flange remains on the abdomen.  A two-piece appliance system can be useful if an ostomate changes appliances frequently throughout the day.  A two-piece stoma pouch system is available with a variety of pouch sizes, and can be either drainable or closed.


See Pouch.








UC


See Ulcerative Colitis.


UI


See Urinary Incontinence.


ULCERATIVE COLITIS


Ulcerative Colitis is a serious, inflammatory disorder, which causes inflammation and sores, and affects the inner lining of the large intestine.  The inflammation originates in the rectum, and spreads through the entire colon.  In severe cases, the colon may need to be removed, and surgery performed to form

a stoma.


Severe, often bloody, diarrhoea is the primary symptom of this disease, which comes and goes unpredictably, and is experienced most often by children, young adults and people over 60.  The

cause of the disease is unknown.


UNDIVERSION


Undiversion is the reconnection of the urinary tract after a urinary diversion in which the bladder remains, to eliminate the stoma and permit passage of urine through the normal opening.


URETEROSTOMY


Ureterostomy is a rarely-performed, ostomy procedure in which one or both ureters are brought

through the abdominal wall to form stoma(s), often a loop ostomy.  This is a temporary procedure (unless the bladder is removed), frequently performed on children.  A pouch must be worn at all times.


URETERS


Ureters are tubes, made of smooth muscle fibres, which carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder.


URETHRA


Urethra is tube, by which urine is discharged from the bladder.


URGE INCONTINENCE


Urge incontinence is a common form of incontinence.  Urge incontinence is when a patient gets a sudden involuntary desire to pass urine, leading to leakage of urine, before there is time to get to

the toilet.  It is usually due to an overactive bladder.


URINARY DIVERSION


A urinary diversion is any one of several surgical procedures, which reroute urine flow away from diseased or defective ureters, bladder or urethra, either temporarily or permanently. Some diversions may result in a stoma.


URINARY FREQUENCY


See Frequent Urination.


URINARY INCONTINENCE


Urinary incontinence is any involuntary or accidental leakage of urine.  It can be a common, unhygienic and distressing problem, which can have a profound impact on a person’s quality of life.


URINARY KOCK POUCH


See Continent Urostomy.


URINARY POUCH SYSTEMS


A urinary pouch system is a one-piece or two-piece pouch system, which is used for urostomies.  It is similar to systems used for colostomies and ileostomies, but a urinary pouch system has a tap or spout, which allows drainage of the urine and also attachment to a night drainage bag.


See Appliance, One-Piece Stoma Pouch, Stoma Appliance and Two-Piece Stoma Pouch.


URINARY TRACT


The urinary tract consists of the kidneys, ureter, bladder and urethra.  The kidneys are reddish-brown, bean-shaped organs and are approximately 12 cm. in length.  They are located at either side of the vertebral column.  The kidneys excrete waste products as urine and regulate fluid and electrolyte balance. The ureters carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder.


URINARY TRACT INFECTION


A urinary tract infection is an infection, which typically involves the kidneys or bladder.  Some warning signs of a urinary tract infection include dark, cloudy urine, strong smelling urine, back pain, fever, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting.  If a urostomate has any of these symptoms, it would be best to seek medical attention quickly.


URINE


Urine is a liquid containing body waste, which is excreted by the kidneys.  It is usually stored in the bladder and discharged through the urethra.  It contains urea, uric acid, and creatinine, salts and pigments.  Alkalinity/acidity of urine is expressed as pH values with 7 as the neutral point.


The kidneys play an important role in balancing the acidity of the body.  Urine should be a clear,

amber-coloured fluid and is usually slightly acid.


URINE CRYSTALS


Urine crystals are sharp, gritty crystals, which can form on a urostomy or unprotected peristomal skin.


See Encrustation.


UROLOGIST


A Urologist is a medical professional, who specialises in the branch of surgery called Urology.  These surgeons are trained to diagnose, treat and manage patients with urological disorders.


UROLOGY


Urology involves the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders of the male reproductive

organs, and the urinary tract of both men and women. The urinary tract consists of the kidneys, the bladder, the ureters and the urethra.


UROSTOMY


A urostomy is a surgically-created opening in the abdominal wall.  It offers an alternative way for urine to leave the body, diverting urine away from a diseased or defective bladder.  A hole is cut in the abdomen so that the open end of the bowel passes through this, resulting in a stoma.   The new passageway is formed to the outside of the body between the urinary tract and the skin.  Urine drains continuously from the stoma, so a urostomy pouch with a tap is used to collect the urine.


The ileal conduit procedure is the most common form of urostomy.  A section near the end of the small bowel (ileum) is surgically removed and relocated as a passageway (conduit) for urine to pass from the kidneys to the outside of the body through a stoma.  It may include removal of the diseased bladder.


See Ileal Conduit and Urinary Diversion.


UROSTOMY FUNCTION


Discharge from a urostomy is normal urine and output depends on the intake.

Urostomates are recommended to drink about 1,800 to 2,500 ml. of liquid every day.  Sufficient fluid intake is the single most important factor in prevention of complications, such as urinary tract infections and stone formation.


UROSTOMY SUPPLIES


Urostomy supplies are products used by stoma patients, who have a urostomy.




UTI


See Urinary Tract Infection.




























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